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Sacred Music

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St. Joseph's Church- Troy, New York
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Why the Old Mass?
Music for the Extraordinary Form of the Latin Rite at St. Joseph's is provided by the parish's own choir under the direction of Music Minister Joseph Grillo

From the Choir Loft:
I would like to invite volunteers to join the Choir in the Tridentine Rite Community. Rehearsals are conducted most Sundays from 2-4pm.  At the same time, I would also like to encourage folks in the congregation to sing along with their choir. Hymn and Chant information is in the Insert of the Bulletin. The Ordinary Chants are usually found in most hand missals, and the Hymns are in the Breaking Bread Hymnal. I look forward to hearing from you. 
                                                                                          --Joe Grillo
From the Catholic Encyclopedia:

Also See:

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In the ars celebrandi, liturgical song has a pre-eminent place. Saint Augustine rightly says in a famous sermon that "the new man sings a new song. Singing is an expression of joy and, if we consider the matter, an expression of love." The People of God assembled for the liturgy sings the praises of God. In the course of her two-thousand-year history, the Church has created, and still creates, music and songs which represent a rich patrimony of faith and love. This heritage must not be lost. Certainly as far as the liturgy is concerned, we cannot say that one song is as good as another. Generic improvisation or the introduction of musical genres which fail to respect the meaning of the liturgy should be avoided. As an element of the liturgy, song should be well integrated into the overall celebration. Consequently everything – texts, music, execution – ought to correspond to the meaning of the mystery being celebrated, the structure of the rite and the liturgical seasons. Finally, while respecting various styles and different and highly praiseworthy traditions, I desire, in accordance with the request advanced by the Synod Fathers, that Gregorian chant be suitably esteemed and employed as the chant proper to the Roman liturgy.

                                                        ---Benedict XVI, Sacramentum Caritatis